The Coup And Counter-Coup Egypt Story

It is a sideshow now because of Syria, but I find the Egyptian drama incredibly interesting for a Red Empire-Blue Empire battleground. Last week, I wrote at the Daily Caller how the Obama administration and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton knew another Islamic Republic was coming and fully went along with it. No nudging was done. They employed no tools to stop it. They wanted to replace the Mubarak regime with its military equipment purchases from the Red Empire and friendly relations with the other Red Empire clients in the area with a nice, Blue Empire democracy.

That failed. It failed because Egyptian generals saw a collapsing county and a distracted American State Department. It also failed because other Red Empire clients knew what was coming. Sisi and his crew wiped out the Muslim Brotherhood and truly dropped the hammer on them. Imprisonment, death sentences, and brutal suppression were all employed. America was caught with its guard down, and Secretary Kerry made odd statements that the Sisi coup was democracy because destroying the democracy was saving democracy. His Vietnam service finally came in handy.

Who helped Sisi and company boldly move? The Saudis quickly handed billions over to the Sisi regime, which brought food prices under control. There was another nation that was definitely interested: Israel. In the Daily Caller, I noted how the U.S. State Department heard how Egypt was going to change how they interacted with Israel. There would be no stopping Hamas, and none of the friendly intelligence communication between the nations. This would truly be a giant shift in the Middle East and threaten Israel. America knew this. Israel knew this, too. There was a completely redacted email from Amos Gilad that Secretary Clinton and company passed around, and we do not know what he wrote.

We do have an idea of what he wrote. Around the same time as his redacted note, the Times of Israel was publishing a blurb on how Amos Gilad saw problems with Egypt handing power over to the clerics and not living up to the treaties with Israel. The signaling from Team Obama is key. Gilad and Israel saw this coming. They knew Team Obama saw this coming, yet the State Department was overriding Congress and sending aid to the new Egyptian democracy and enabling the Muslim Brotherhood. America, as represented by the Blue Empire, had no qualms with a Muslim Brotherhood-led Egypt, and had not publicly demanded adherence to decades old treaties and agreements.

Sisi was working with the Muslim Brotherhood, and there was some friction, but Egypt’s deep power has always been who controlled its military. All of Egypt lives along the Nile and within a quick march of the Pharaoh’s men. Sometimes the soldiers are under a Pharaoh, sometimes a British consul, and now under secular military dictators, but all keep the peace. Sisi had that in the back of his mind with controlling power. Saudi Arabia and Israel probably made it apparent to Sisi that conflict would come and any friction with Israel would be a quick loss, so why not overthrow the MB and the Saudis will throw you some cash? The unofficial alliance between the Saudis and Israelis is quite the one-two punch in a region of instability.

In the end, Egypt stays a Red Empire client, but there is one kink in the process. A quick Google news search of “Egypt Russia” yields many stories of Egypt and Russia signing trade agreements, performing military exercises, and even building a nuclear power plant. There is information sharing between the two nations between military services, and Egypt has stated that Russia should be a part of any counter-terrorism efforts in the region. These are small moves, but steady moves. These are all the more fantastic in the aftermath of a Russian airliner explosion over Egypt.

America’s Red and Blue Empires are not the only patrons around the world. Egypt may have been fought over between the Blue and the Red Empires in America’s grey government, but the red team, as in not American, may be the ultimate final patron that sucks in Egypt. America’s blatant favoritism and efforts to help the Muslim Brotherhood while punishing the military tipped the hand of the blue team to Sisi and company. This might be a small mistake when one is the hyperpower throwing chips, drinking freely and playing any hand at the poker table with a stack of winnings. It is a blaring warning sign to any player and a fatal tell when the chips are running low.

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28 Comments

  1. Any insight on “the Blue Empire” as related to Suleiman? Did they just view him as Mubarak or had they already backed themselves into a “democracy only” corner?

  2. When you call it a coup. Do you acknowledge the events leading to June 30th? Or is coup now the mainstream word?

    I’m truly asking.

    In Egypt, do you think that if the people don’t want a specific person in charge, they can’t remove them? It happened twice so far. Mubarak and Morsi.

    Mubarak wasn’t backed by “big strong organizations/countries”?

    How about Morsi. Wasn’t he backed by big strong organizations/countries?

    Or is Sisi the only one that can’t be removed because of support he gets?

    Give the people credit. Be unbiased.

    1. In Egypt, do you think that if the people don’t want a specific person in charge, they can’t remove them?

      What do you think would’ve happened if Obama/Clinton said they support the legitimacy of Mubarak regime, but respect the economic grievances of the people (which was pretty much S.O.P. prior to Obama)?

      1. The Egyptian people didn’t wait for approval of foreign leaders, media or random reports about what’s trending every day.

        We all know the story, and whoever was in Egypt at the time, lived it. A spark ignited 25 Jan, and also June 30th.

        I am in no way saying Sisi is the perfect leader. What I’m saying is, if we truly want change, we need to be unbiased, or at least be biased towards Egypt, or just their people.

        If Sisi is bad and the most horrible person that ever existed in the history of humanity, don’t turn around and claim that Morsi was the perfect democratic white knight, we all know it’s not true, we’ve witnessed it. Our streets saw it, no matter how hard you want to convince the outside world of the coup.

        The Egyptian people, at the time, chose to have him removed, and we asked the military to do it.

        Now, if many people feel that Sisi is not fit for presidency, by all means, make your reports, help build for a better future. Educate and strengthen the people you think would fit to lead the country for the next Election, or even if necessary, an early election.

        Westernizing reports by terms like “General Al Sisi”, to paint an army dictator image, and to make the army institution as a whole to be “the devil”, is purely a Cuba type reporting, in the 90s. It’s not speaking to Egyptians.

        Again, be unbiased, think of the Egyptian people, not just the MB. Not just Muslims. Egypt is blessed with a beautiful mix of races and beliefs, and that is why Morsi was removed.

        All the reports I read “Sisi has killed this number of people” make me wonder, how is that considered reporting? By their definition, every leader in the world is a murderer, since we’re inhering the action of a police officer to them.

        How about USA? Canada? Spain? Iraq? Germany? List whatever country, how many murders in them caused by officials?

        Politics, it’s why I hate it. The difference between Morsi and Sisi is not sentimental reports, it’s personal (official) statements and actions.

        Diplomatically, politically, and on a civil scale, Morsi’s record in statements, actions and decisions were a disaster. Don’t take my words as an attack, please. I urge you to go back and re-read the official statements and decisions and their intention.

        Compare that to Sisi’s statements and decisions. It’s why he’s getting a larger acceptance from the world.

        Or is Japan, Germany, Saudia, Kuwait, Russia, Italy, UK, France..etc are all controlled by Sisi?

        Conspiracy theories make good news. If you want the good of the country, be unbiased.

        Find your leader, find your ideology, help make it true for the one aim all Egyptians want, peace and stability.

        I am an Egyptian, I will not follow a person blindly, no matter who he is, I will not be manipulated with religion or conspiracy theories.

        Lead me with facts, educate me, don’t use my weaknesses. Help make me stronger and the Egyptian people will follow you.

        Thanks.

        1. You appear to write English very well, but it doesn’t appear you even read the article. The author didn’t make any case for Sisi being “evil.” Where did you get that? Nor is it at all clear why you think the article (or maybe you’re referencing my comment) is somehow supporting the MB/Morsi.

          To simplify the original article, the author is looking at Egypt from the perspective of US political factions. Republicans (Red Empire) supported Mubarak, Obama (Blue Empire) essentially abandoned that support when the Arab Spring occurred. The author is asking why they did so when it was obvious the MB was the likely successor and would complicate US interests in the region.

          If you are Egyptian, were you there in 2011? If you left the country prior, why did you leave?

          1. Never left. Never will.

            Thanks for the explanation.

          2. “Sisi and his crew wiped out the Muslim Brotherhood and truly dropped the hammer on them. Imprisonment, death sentences, and brutal suppression were all employed.”

            “Sometimes the soldiers are under a Pharaoh, sometimes a British consul, and now under secular military dictators.”

            I guess you had to suffer from the typical radical aftermath from MB that we still suffer from to know.

            Maybe you’re right. The author calling MB an oppressed group and Sisi a dictator is no way implying him to be evil.

            It’s why I first asked “do you acknowledge the events leading to June 30?”

            That’s the biased. I’m really not trying to be sarcastic, I’m truly trying to point something out. Many authors are reporting based on information from a group labeled by many countries now, terrorists.

            A bomb exploded near where I live, about 5 miles, from a so called “MB supporter”. Imbaba court. Look it up, and all the other incidents.

            Abu Islam, calling Christianity “A religion based on penis worship”. An MB preacher. Look it up.

            Morsi was removed because of the oppression.

            I protested in June 30th to have Morsi removed. Many have, I won’t mention numbers, you can look that up as well.

            I voted for Sisi, so did many of the people I know. Including family and friends.

            But ignore all those events, all those votes, and call it a coup/dictatorship.

            Nevertheless, reporter should not believe me as well. Just because I write in detail, doesn’t mean I’m correct.

            Don’t Google it. That’s not reporting.

            I like his perspective on the American view on things, but his reporting, I’m sorry.

            Sure, corruption exists, horrible atrocities still happen, doesn’t mean I get to change history or listen to one side.

            Thanks for the debate.

          3. Never left. Never will.

            Can you give an accounting of the reasoning behind the original Arab Spring/removal of Mubarak (meaning, not just your own, but all the perspectives you are comfortable providing)?

          4. Maybe the author will see your comments and respond, but suffice it to say it is clear the author isn’t attaching all of your negative interpretations to these words.

            In the West, a coup means something along the lines of the forced removal and replacement of a governor.

        2. Lead me with facts, educate me, don’t use my weaknesses. Help make me stronger and the Egyptian people will follow you.

          LOL. What does this mean? Over-promising BS is a pretty sure way to end up at the bottom of a heap of BS.

          1. Indeed.

          2. Apologies, I have to respond here, because it seems the comments have a threshold limit for inline replies.

            Can you give an accounting of the reasoning behind the original Arab Spring/removal of Mubarak (meaning, not just your own, but all the perspectives you are comfortable providing)?

            In most developed countries, society consists of upper class, middle class and the poverty line, however you want to call it. I don’t like calling it lower class, seems insulting.

            Usually the upper and poverty classes are the lower figures, while middle class is majority or at least near 40%.

            In Egypt, middle class was almost nonexistent. Add to that the general corruption that reached levels where even if you want to apply for something as simple as a driver’s license, you had to bribe your way in, and it’s a long way in.

            That’s for middle class, you can imagine how the poverty line lived.

            Police force, at the time, were working on filling quotas. Literally “I have to make 30 arrests to get my raise”, so they would roam the streets, snatching the weak and slapping charges, if you dared to talk back or even try to defend, you’d be gone.

            Corruption on a massive scale, it was really a one percenter haven. If you had money, you can do anything, and when I say anything, I mean it.

            Expand that to all aspects. Health, education, commerce. Almost all those in charge, were corrupt. We used to call them “Belly men”. Implying they’re heavy set, because they’re well fed, while the people can barely afford basic food elements.

            That’s the jest of it, in my opinion. Though in detail, it’s much much more.

            In the West, a coup means something along the lines of the forced removal and replacement of a governor.

            Then we fall under miscommunication and another word should be used. To us, it translates to exactly what you said, but add to it “illegally”.

            Democracy in its definition means that the elected is chosen, and after chosen they must adhere to the promises and the needs of the people. If they try to oppress or harm or put the country in a downhill route, the people have the right to call for re-election.

            It’s what happened. The irony here, Mubarak actually stepped down, even after a couple of delirious days where he thought he might fix it by changing some aspects. At the end, he stepped down. Morsi, did not. That’s the “June 30” protests.

            Just Google “Egypt June 30” and click on Images.

            I truly believe that MB are able to convince foreign reporters because they have a well established foreign affairs branches.

            I’m not going to say “MB slaughtered”, I have no way to prove that. It’s why I rely on statements from their leaders, members and supporters. It’s the same way I judge Sisi right now.

            I’m honestly surprised they’re getting any type of sympathy from anyone. They had TV channels, recorded footage, of them, talking about… what’s the point. If you want to know, you can find out easily.

            Let’s just say, the only difference between MB and Al Qaeda is, the fashion statement for their foreign affairs branches, and manipulation. Like that red carpet report.

            My friend and I were laughing when we first saw the reports, we said “look, the carpet made the news. Viva Egypt”.

            It took all the attention of the media, a carpet, and how much it costs, what was the figure? $250,000 or something?

            But no one reports the issues that affect the people. Let’s all talk about an old carpet.

            Ministry of communication for example. Would love to see a report about Egypt’s telecommunication infrastructure, from telephones to Internet. Look up Egypt IRE.

            This will be my last response, I tend to write a lot and I could go on for days. I’ll stop myself.

            Thanks again for the debate, I enjoyed it.

          3. Thank you as well.

  3. Far more noteworthy than Landry’s post or the comments themselves, is getting to see a mind reeling under the weight of democracy, after being completely unaccustomed to such a burden.

    Then we fall under miscommunication and another word should be used. To us, (coup) translates to exactly what you said, but add to it “illegally”.

    A simple explanation that it wasn’t “illegal” precisely because it was successful and other powers did not intervene cannot suffice. No, it must be imbued with justice.

    Democracy in its definition means that the elected is chosen, and after chosen they must adhere to the promises and the needs of the people.

    Sweet, sweet justice for the people.

    “Curious Mind” probably thinks Mubarak’s regime had too much foreign influence. Egypt hasn’t seen “influence” yet (and he even asked for it: “Now, if many people feel that Sisi is not fit for presidency, by all means, make your reports, help build for a better future”)…

    1. Far more noteworthy than Landry’s post or the comments themselves, is getting to see a mind reeling under the weight of democracy, after being completely unaccustomed to such a burden.

      You assume too much. I said I live in Egypt, and would never leave it. I said I was here in 2011, 2013 and I’m there now. I never said I’ve only lived in Egypt.

      I studied abroad, in fact, a good portion of my upbringing wasn’t in Egypt. Specifically 10-24 years old. That’s history though.

      It is because I know the burden and the privilege to choose, I commented.

      A simple explanation that it wasn’t “illegal” precisely because it was successful and other powers did not intervene cannot suffice. No, it must be imbued with justice.

      Yes, the theory of “The victor gets to write history”. My question still remains, do you not acknowledge the events? Let me rephrase, in the most democratic way I can think of.

      5 people, elect one person within them to lead them in a road trip. The person accepts, they ask of that person to lead them safely, they note what the differences between them are, food preferences, periods of times they’re comfortable driving and so on.

      The elected person decides to use uncharted routes, as shortcuts. He leads them to rest stops that ignores 2 of the people’s references. He drives longer than they’re comfortable with, and he stops to interact and deals with a person that is hates two of the people he’s with.

      Do they have the right to re-elect? If he refuses to accept, do they have the right to ignore him and elect another person? If he threatens with violence and “terrifying chaos”, do they have the right to evade or protect themselves?

      You are either clueless of what happened in Egypt or refuse to believe that the people asked for it. Either way, it doesn’t matter, at the end, you won’t have to deal with any of it.

      Like I said, you had to see and live it, to speak up.

      “Curious Mind” probably thinks Mubarak’s regime had too much foreign influence. Egypt hasn’t seen “influence” yet (and he even asked for it: “Now, if many people feel that Sisi is not fit for presidency, by all means, make your reports, help build for a better future”)…

      No clue what that’s supposed to mean. If you’re implying that I somehow hated Mubarak because a specific country had influence in his policy, then you’re wrong.

      I truly believe we’re not alone in the world. There is no such thing “We’re always right, we can live without anyone else” That is naive thinking.

      Every country needs the other. It’s the natural order of things. Whether it’s imports, exports, or something as simple as learning from mistakes and successes of others.

      I protested Mubarak for the reasons I mentioned. Anyone that wants to add to it, they’re free to do so, but they are not my words nor my reason.

      Though, since you’re talking about influence. I would love to see how you react, when your life, not just a debate online, is affected. Though I wouldn’t wish that for you, or anyone in the world.

      Believe what you will. You read, and become convinced. I hope you at least used effort to research MB, and not just their tailored statements.

      Don’t believe any of the reports, you’ll end up thinking “Oh, they’re just puppets of the dictator system”. Please, research the many TV channels where they’ve made statements against everything that we believe in.

      Hear it from them, not me, or anyone else. Use that effort to instead going “He must have thought this, and I would assume”, to “At this date, this time, that person endorsed/condemned/..etc”.

      I leave you with this, please, if you think highly of the Muslim Brotherhood, campaign to give them full asylum in your country, and please, elect them to lead you. I truly mean it.

      Also, at the very least, research official statements from all side, to at least know what they endorse. Many of it is in Arabic, but it’s not hard getting translations of video footages from multiple sources.

      To be clear, I’m not talking about videos of crimes, or killings. Those can be used against all sides, we’ve seen enough of it to know how easily it can be manipulated.

      Simply look for preaching, endorsements and their official record when they were in rule, before, and after it.

      However, like I said, believe what you will.

      Thanks again.

    2. My last comment to eliminate any assumptions.

      I am again saying, in no way I’m implying Sisi is a perfect president. He definitely has his shortcomings, and he and the system is highly affected by the traditions of the past. When I say the system, I mean everyone in Egypt.

      Our political scene has a long road to mature and become experienced. Especially in foreign affairs.

      All my comments were about one point. Hate a leader or love him, but please, don’t re-write history or simply sympathize with a group because you feel they’re oppressed.

      Everything we do is a privilege, not a right. Once you affect others, that privilege is taken away from you.

      I’ll speak for myself and the people I know, though you are free to expand that, visit Egypt, and ask as many as you want, see the majority.

      Even if majority hate Sisi by now, in no way they’re endorsing MB.

      This is the only way I can describe it. When you mention MB as an oppressed group, to us, is giving radical groups an excuse. If you preach hate, and refuse fellow countryman with different religions to simply be, then I speak up and refuse. Like I said, don’t take anyone’s word for it. Research their own statements.

      I can help guide you, but I might be seen as part of the Sisi system or whatever other titles are used nowadays. Seek it yourself, it is not hard to find.

      I also forgot to mention, no, I didn’t ask for influence. I asked if you want truly help, don’t believe me, don’t believe anyone. Research yourself, then help the people or if you see fit, the leadership, to make this country better.

      I didn’t ask for influence. Though I’ll never turn down advice from anyone, we’re all humans, and we can all learn from each others experiences.

  4. This will be my last response, I tend to write a lot and I could go on for days. I’ll stop myself.

    What happened? If you want to continue will you at least attempt to give an accounting of the reasoning behind the original Arab Spring/removal of Mubarak (you gave your own, but all the perspectives you are comfortable providing)?

    1. I honestly don’t understand what you’re asking. Is there some kind of notion that what I had mentioned not the general idea? Is there a theory I’m missing?

      And what happened is I decided to visit, I was curious if the author had replied.

      1. I would not ask you if I already knew about the “street perspective” for why the Arab Spring happened. Earlier after relating your opinion, you stated “Though in detail, it’s much much more.” What is the “in detail?”

        And surely not all of the protesters were of the same opinion. What were some of the other perspectives you encountered?

        1. Against Mubarak? It all fell under a “Our lives are ruined, we are ignored, we are forgotten”.

          That’s the majority. If you want the minority opinions, there were some weird stuff.

          Examples:
          – A small group of young people actually believed that if they oust Mubarak, we would get all the stolen money back, and every citizen would get around one to two million Egyptian pounds, their understanding of an economy’s inflation was, sub-par, to say the least.
          – Another small group I’ve seen were discussing how they could free Palestine, they made the TV as well. It was more of a heated moment than anything else.

          And many other random thoughts. I can’t account for all of them.

          1. Thank you.

            What were the people not actually involved in the protests saying about it?

    2. Just noticed your question about people that didn’t protest.

      Many hated it, and rightfully so. In the midst of all the protests, chaos erupted and resulted in many services to be halted and of course, the scum of the earth started taking advantage of the situation by stealing and committing other atrocious crimes.

      We actually had a neighborhood watch system, where every able person would patrol on foot at night, in shifts. It was terrifying.

      Generally, the ones that didn’t protest appreciate the idea, but hate it at the same time for what it resulted to our economy and all the violations in the middle of everything.

      For some reason though, the one service that never stopped was the Subway. I never understood that, it’s kind of funny. On top it could be chaos, but if you go down, everything is working, go in the train and go home. Kudos to them.

  5. I studied abroad, in fact, a good portion of my upbringing wasn’t in Egypt. Specifically 10-24 years old. That’s history though.

    Thanks for the context.

    Earlier you said: “Politics, it’s why I hate it.” Yet, do you see that you’ve now condemned yourself and your countrymen to being “democrats?” From my memory, it was people in your exact category (Western educated twenty-somethings) that lead the Arab Spring with the intent of holding elections and knowing full well the likely victor was going to be Muslim Brotherhood.

    Frankly, do you realize how fortunate your country is to still have an independent military to save you? The original hypothesis (after Obama abandoned Mubarak and then passed on Suleiman) for Egypt was that the “people” desperate for economic solutions would elect a group of Muslim clerics called the Muslim Brotherhood. Then, after the MB failed to implement any positive economic change, they would be ousted by a more “extreme” Muslims, and so on, until there was no democracy or someone intervened. I stopped paying attention after the US abandoned Mubarak and Suleiman and none of the US military (as far as I know) resigned.

    No clue what that’s supposed to mean.

    It means exactly what it says. You’re a democrat now! Look how full of projection your posts are. There have been ZERO judgmental posts about Egypt’s government, yet you are constantly defending the “will of people” against ghosts. Desperately trying to convince Westerner’s that your people are “pure and clean.” Why?

  6. There have been ZERO judgmental posts about Egypt’s government, yet you are constantly defending the “will of people” against ghosts. Desperately trying to convince Westerner’s that your people are “pure and clean.” Why?

    Far from it. You should see my posts on Reddit, and even in my comments here.

    I clearly stated that we have a long way to mature, politically. I also mentioned how the system as a whole is affected by the traditions of the past, and I then explained by system, I mean everyone in Egypt.

    I also mentioned that we do need advice.

    It’s not ghosts, I’m specifically replying to statements like “Dictator Sisi and his crew”, “The suppressed Muslim Brotherhood”. I quoted the author earlier. That is what I’m commenting on.

    I even went further and asked to not side with anyone, not Sisi, not MB, but the people. Not because they’re pure, but because they’re the people of the country.

    Is that zero judgmental, as you put it? If so, then I probably lack an aspect in understanding English.

    Then, after the MB failed to implement any positive economic change

    You are exactly right. MB did indeed fool us. It is why exactly I mentioned the events leading to June 30. Because we realized the horrible mistake we’ve made.

    I never voted for Morsi, though many people around me did, at the time. I remember it vividly, the day everyone realized the horrible mistake, and when the “Rebel” movement happened, to collect signatures from the people by the millions to oust Morsi and his Brotherhood.

    I truly believe that, at least in my region, a religion based ruling would be corrupted even faster than a so called dictator one. Simply because they’d be tapping into the spiritual side of things, where people can believe anything.

    That’s why I said “Research Abu Islam”, for example. In fact, research any of their official TV channels, preaching and many of the official statements. The things they preached and were trying to brain wash the uneducated with, were… I don’t even know how to describe it. It’s why I asked you to research it yourself, if you’re curious, to make your own judgement.

    It’s not just economics. We’re suffering from that and will continue to suffer for at least a decade.

  7. Is that zero judgmental, as you put it? If so, then I probably lack an aspect in understanding English.

    Yes, there is a definite misunderstanding with your English. I don’t want to put words in the author’s mouth, but let’s just assume he is as appalled by the MB as yourself. The sentence about “suppression” you’re referencing is not judgmental. He is just pointing out the obviousness that if Sisi used such tactics, they are practically the opposite of “democratic.” And he never called Sisi a “dictator.” He simply pointed out that the Army has existed under many forms of government; and gave it (lets just assume this as the author’s intent) quite a compliment, that it has historically maintained the peace of your country.

    It’s not just economics.

    What else? You mentioned the religious. Corruption?

    1. Thank you for the explanation. I appreciate it.

      What else? You mentioned the religious. Corruption?

      Indeed. We’re a majority Muslim country, though we are not strict. We’ve always been known to be moderate, or to be more accurate, just living our daily lives and many become religiously touched on special occasions, such as Ramadan.

      However, there are many that religious as well. Others not Muslims, and so on. We’re very mixed in our beliefs.

      All of a sudden there is this general fear that we would become a strict religious country, where we started to see women in our families considering ideas such as “I’ll wear Hijab, just in case”. An idea that absolutely unacceptable to many of us, for a woman to wear hijab simply because a government tells her to.

      It all started as speculations. We were worried, but at the same time we said “Nah, they would never do that”.

      Then all of a sudden we see a surge of extreme and hateful preaching, in mosques, and random TV channels that popped up from no where.

      Then Satellite channels started to show up with not only hateful speech, but complete and utter nonsense that has only one goal: “The Christians are evil, all of them”.

      I don’t know if I’m allowed to link to YouTube video, but here is an example of a preacher on one of their TV channels, it’s subtitled. You can confirm what he’s saying if you know any Arabic speaking people.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4C8e_UxUWcE

      This is the third time I mention that person. That same person burnt a bible.

      I’m not sure what the West view about us on this, but we really don’t accept that.

      It started from there, religion oppression and manipulation. Many people are uneducated in Egypt and convincing them of such things wouldn’t take long.

      Then we started to official presidential statements from Morsi, like his famous Constitution editorial that entitles him to override any decision and that decision is final.

      Then we started seeing reports from the MB themselves, their international branches, how they are funding and their goal is to turn Egypt into a Islamic Rule, a state of the Share’ya.

      Then the video that sparked the Rebel’s movement, when we saw our president Morsi giving a speech, and the leader of MB standing behind him, literally telling him what to say, to a point where Morsi was confused and the “Morshed” had to speak up so Morsi would hear him. His word was “Al Qasas”, which roughly translates to “An eye for an eye”. You are free to do your own research on this.

      It wasn’t just economics. If they stayed in rule, Saudia’s very strict rule would seem like a haven to us.

      Then of course all the economical decision, specifically relating to Energy, housing and transportation. They were just a train wreck, and if they were to be implemented, the country would have been gone.

      Again, you’re free to do your own research on this, it’s their official statements.

  8. Thank you as well.

    Do you remember what the protesters thought about Suleiman during the Arab Spring?

    1. Yes. He was one of the most controversial names. His record was excellent, but clouded with many speculations because he was an Intelligence Agency man.

      People feared those agencies back then, their record in Mubarak time was horrifying, to say the least. Stories of how people would vanish when a national security team snatches you. Stories about how they used those agencies to silence many.

      I’ve read about it, seen many interviews, though I’ve never experienced anything similar. Though I don’t doubt it, because I’ve seen the police force back then.

      Even his death was largely considered to be a conspiracy. Either he was murdered by the old regime, or he never really died. Very similar to the Elvis theories.

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